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I am confused why the compound noun has the singular verb "HAS" in the modifier clause "which has won awards..." and the plural verb "HAVE" as the main verb.

Should I use plural or singular verb as the verb in the main and modifier clause?

A national supermarket chain and a locally owned bakery, which HAS won awards for its crosissants, HAVE seen a significant decrease in the revenue since the biggest employer in the area shut down.

2 Answers 2

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Read it this way:

A national supermarket chain and a locally owned bakery (which HAS won awards for its crosissants[sic]) HAVE seen a significant decrease in the revenue since the biggest employer in the area shut down.

The has applies to a bakery and have to both: the supermarket chain and bakery.

Check restrictive and non-restrictive clauses here.

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  • How do I determine whether the non-restrictive clause applies to both the compound nouns or individual noun, as shown in this case. Commented Sep 16, 2019 at 13:10
  • The string between the commas. The comma before which and after crosissants[sic].
    – Maulik V
    Commented Sep 16, 2019 at 13:22
  • in this case, how do I write a restrictive clause for both the supermarket and bakery? I am trying understand how does it make a difference. Commented Sep 17, 2019 at 6:28
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The HAS modifies 1) a locally owned bakery. The HAVE modifies 1)a national supermarket chain and 2)a locally owned bakery

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