3

I would like to say that the furniture is in bad condition (because of a long use) but still usable. Can I use 'shabby furniture'? If I use 'worn-out furniture' does it mean that it is no longer usable and has to be thrown out?

What about kitchen area? Can I say 'shabby kitchen area' (meaning - also in a bad condition because used for a long time)?

Thank you in advance!

0
3

Yes that is the correct meaning of "shabby". Your sentences seem to mean exactly what you intend.

0
1

To me, the use of 'shabby' is perfectly fine when describing furniture and describes what you are trying to say perfectly. It shows that the furniture is old and coming apart.

However, as a native English speaker, I can't put my finger on exactly why but it sounds strange to me to describe a kitchen as 'shabby'. I think it is because I would only ever use 'shabby' to describe an item. Some words that sound better to me in order to describe a kitchen in this way are : dingy, run-down, miserable, neglected and tacky.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.