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I would like to know if the following sentence: "I am running faster than you do" is a correct sentence.

I know most of the time it should be "I am running faster than you are" or "I run faster than you do", but I just want to know if in a specific context this sentence can be used.

For example, I am a track and field athlete, and I am training with someone else. I know how fast he can run and he's now watching me practicing. This guy always beats me when we practice together. But this time is different.

I see the timer as I am going to go through the finish line this time and I know that I am faster than he usually is. So I yell, "Look! I am running faster than you do!"

Is this sentence acceptable in the context above?

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    I would add “usually”: “I am running faster than you usually do.” – Jim Sep 17 '19 at 19:30
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It's an excellent question, and I think you have the right idea.

I think I would word it this way:

I am running faster than you run!

instead of saying:

I am running faster than you do!

(I think your version is grammatical for the situation you describe; however, it's such an odd sentence that I think run sounds better than the more vague do.)

Moreover, I agree with the comment saying how the sentence could be made even more clear by adding an adverb like usually, typically, or normally.

I am running faster than you normally run!

Fact is, though, it would be a very rare sentence indeed, as most runners would wait until after their run was finished, and say:

I ran faster than you typically run!

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Running:

The action or movement of a runner

Do:

We use do to talk about actions in general, when we do not specify exactly what the action is and According to Cambridge Dictionary do can also be used to avoid repeating a verb or verb phrase:

She runs much faster than he does.

so saying:

I am running faster than you do

is acceptable usage.

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