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“In the period we not enter, Romanticism, the Account became the preeminent formula for literary production.”

In the sentence above, does the ‘not’ make sense? Should I use ‘don’t’ instead?

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  • 3
    I suspect that "not" is a typo for "now" or perhaps "next", but without the source, cannot confirm this. Sep 18, 2019 at 4:21
  • 3
    Mantra, where is this from? Did you write it? What is the context?
    – AIQ
    Sep 18, 2019 at 4:21
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    I'm almost certain this is a typo for now, as suggested by @DavidSiegel. It's certainly not grammatical as it stands.
    – Colin Fine
    Sep 18, 2019 at 5:57
  • The sentence, even after books4languages correction, still doesn't make sense. What is the "Account" a story, a novel, a romance? And why do we not enter the Romanticism period?
    – Mari-Lou A
    Sep 19, 2019 at 10:17
  • Please, in the future, provide more context in your posts. Where did you find it? What's the context? etc. See Details, Please and the Contributor's Guide (Asking) for more tips and examples.
    – Em.
    Sep 22, 2019 at 9:11

1 Answer 1

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You cannot have 'not' + verb in this sentence. It is better to write:

“In the period that we do not (don't) enter, Romanticism, the Account became the preeminent formula for literary production.”

You can see more about this rule here: https://open.books4languages.com/english-a1-grammar/chapter/present-simple-negative/

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  • Thank you. You see, that sentence was written by my literature professor. I thought something looked odd, and indeed, it is not properly written.
    – Mantra.
    Sep 18, 2019 at 12:11

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