0

I am asking a professor to share an article with me which has not become public yet. In the email, I am trying to say:

I am very eager to read your new paper and get inspirational ideas.

or something like

I am very eager to read your new paper and become inspired by it if possible.

But I think both of the above sentences are somewhat strange for a native English speaker. It would be kind of you if you could help me to express what I mean correctly.

2

The phrase "inspirational ideas" is not quite the same as "ideas which which will (or may) inspire me". At least in US English, "inspirational" specifically implies a religious, or spiritual if not strictly religious, concept. "Inspirational music" is religious or spiritual music. The same is true for "an inspirational poem", and so on.

So the first option might better read:

I am very eager to read your new paper and get ideas which may inspire me.

The second option might be recast as:

I am very eager to read your new paper. I hope it will inspire me.

In either case, it might be stronger if you say just what the paper will inspire you to do, or how it will inspire you. For example:

I am very eager to read your new paper and get ideas which may inspire me to do fresh work in the field of X.

This should be as specific as possible, given what you know of the subject.

The professor may also be glad to hear what you hope or expect to learn from the paper.

I am very eager to read your new paper and Learn more about X. I hope this may inspire me to do fresh work in the field of Y.

And I would think that you will want to thank the professor in advance for sharing the paper.

Of course, there are many other ways to express this idea.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.