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I am generally acquainted to seeing unknown to followed by a noun, pronoun or noun phrase. What about this case

As for how we know, the equipment used is unknown to be in the Houthis’ arsenal.

Is it grammatical?

The full paragraph from where it was excerpted:

He dismissed the claim by the Houthis that they had attacked the oil facilities. “The intelligence community has high confidence that these were not weapons that would have been in the possession of the Houthis,” Mr. Pompeo said. “As for how we know, the equipment used is unknown to be in the Houthis’ arsenal.”

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    Pompeo misspoke. He negated the wrong word. He meant to say, "As for how we know, the equipment used is known not to be in the Houthis' arsenal."
    – Juhasz
    Sep 18, 2019 at 22:47

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I would think it more natural to have said :

... the equipment used is not known to be in the Houthis’ arsenal.”

"Unknown to" is indeed usually followed by a pronoun, noun, or noun phrase indicating the person, group or entity (or personified thing) that does not know the subject of the verb.

  • Criminal libel is unknown to US law.
  • But Turkish was unknown to Jane.
  • The law of gravity was unknown to Aristotle.

I am not sure if the use in the quotation is ungrammatical, but it is surely unusual.

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