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1- It turns out that someone in the high risk group has twice the risk as those in the low risk group

2- It turns out that someone in the high risk group has twice the risk than those in the low risk group

Do these two sentences mean the same thing?

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I agree with the above answer. I am also English and to me 'twice the risk as' seems grammatically correct to me.

In the case of using 'than', this is used when we want to measure something along a scale. You could rephrase the sentence and say 'It turns out that someone in the high risk group has a risk two times higher than those of the lower risk group'.

You can also use 'of': a risk twice the size of those in the lower risk group.

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Possibly UK and US English speakers will have different opinions about this - I'm from the UK. This discussion of "different from" and "different than" usages might be interesting, if not directly relevant to your question.

Twice is a numeric comparator, we say

twice as many

not

twice than many

So I prefer

It turns out that someone in the high risk group has twice the risk as those in the low risk group

using "than" feels completely wrong to me. However I'm not quite comfortable with that phrasing. My first problem is that someone is singular and those is plural. Secondly, and this may well just be my preference, we have a has in the first clause, so I feel that we need a verb in the second.

It turns out that someone in the high risk group has twice the risk as does someone in the low risk group
  • Thank you. I wonder if I can rewrite the sentence you suggested, "It turns out that someone in the high risk group has twice the risk as does someone in the low risk group." to "It turns out that someone in the high risk group has twice the risk as someone has in the low risk group." or "It turns out that someone in the high risk group has twice the risk as someone does in the low risk group – Talha Özden Sep 19 at 14:39
  • I put "does" (or has) first, because "someone in the high risk group" is a single concept, and putting "does" in the middle breaks that up. I think using "has" in both places (high and low) is best. – djna Sep 20 at 4:30

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