0

This summer, I sought to engage myself in experiences that I felt were relevant to what I have been learning with my art history major.

https://www.southwestern.edu/live/news/13558-curating-the-arts

What is the difference between “learn with my major” and “learn from my major”? Are they interchangeable here?

  • It makes no difference to the meaning whether you use with or from. Alternative prepositions which might be considered "acceptable" for this exact context include on, in, through, and probably others. In short, it's not a context where there's a single "standard" preposition (though I suspect that in practice on is the most likely choice for most native speakers). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 19 at 14:08
2

One learns from a teacher, or a text, or a course of study, or some other source of knowledge. I suppose that a major in college/university study could be called a "course of study", but I would think a person really learns from the classwork, readings, and projects done during the process of that major.

"Learning with X" is a rather vague statement that the learning is in some way associated with X, but doesn't really indicate how. It is not wrong, but may well be unclear. It could include the same situation as "learning from X". It can also be used where X is a fellow-student, or a mentor.

I would perhaps recast the sentence as:

This summer, I sought to engage myself in experiences that I felt were relevant to what I have been learning as I pursued my art history major.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.