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"The key to understanding big data is that data has to be managed so that it can meet the business requirement a given solution is designed to support" (Hurwitz, Nugent, Halper, & Kaufman, 2013, p. 1).

Is this sentence correctly crafted? What does the part after so that mean?

Reference:

Hurwitz, J. S., Nugent, A., Halper, F., & Kaufman, M. (2013). Big data for dummies. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

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    It's grammatical; just add a 'which' after 'requirement'. The meaning is very much obvious and ' so that' is an adverbial subordinating conjunction meaning ' with the intent that'. Sep 19, 2019 at 18:04

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The grammar of that sentence is OK. Its meaning is a little hard to understand, especially without the rest of the context, because it is pretty vague, and full of non-specific vocabulary words.

The words following "so that":

"it can meet the business requirement a given solution is designed to support"

are a clause defining the way that big data must be managed.

In short, it (the big data) must be managed "so that it meets a requirement". The rest of the words are there to describe that requirement. It is a "business" requirement, and the requirement is what "a given solution is designed to support."

Essentially what this sentence means is,

"You have to manage your big data in such a way that it helps you."

But that doesn't sound like I have a PhD in Business, does it?

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