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Which form would a native English speaker use here?

I'm the kind of person who doesn't like a movie if it's not very convincing.

I'm the kind of person who wouldn't like a movie if it wasn't very convincing.

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When you make a conditional statement you can either say what happens when the conditions are met:

1) I'm the kind of person who doesn't like a movie if it's not very convincing.

or you can say what would happen if the conditions were met:

2) I'm the kind of person who wouldn't like a movie if it wasn't very convincing.

Either way it amounts to the same thing. Both statements have the same meaning and are equally idiomatic.

When the conditions in question are likely and reasonable, like in your example, a native speaker of English might use either form of conditional statement.

If the condition in the statement is very horrific, emotional, or unlikely, you might want to keep the discussion as hypothetical as possible and stick with option #2. Example:

I'm the kind of person who would go into a state of complete denial if a nuclear war happened.

Not:

I'm the kind of person who goes into a state of complete denial if a nuclear war happens.

But if you were polishing a movie review, say, for publication, sentence #1 would probably be preferable because it is more direct and decisive.

In fact, in that case, even more direct and decisive would be simply:

I won't like a movie if it's not very convincing.

But I realize that wasn't part of the question.

  • Lorel C. If the intention is to just communicate the message (without emphasis or dramatic effect), would you agree that a more direct statement would be suitable: "I dislike movies that are not very convincing"? – AIQ Sep 22 at 18:45
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    @AIQ Writing experts and English teachers usually prefer the simplest, most direct statement that correctly expresses your meaning. So yeah, I think your example works fine. – Lorel C. Sep 22 at 18:53

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