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Tell me please what especially means in the following sejtence.

All my family likes music. My father, especially, goes to as many concerts as he possiblay can.

I would get it if there were the verb like instead of go meaning that their father likes concerts or whatever to a greater extent. I cannot get how someone can go to a greater extent somewhere. Does the sentence mean the same as the following?

All my family likes music, especially my father. He goes to as many concerts as he possibally can.

  • I don't see what you're fretting about. In both your examples, the partial focusing modifier "especially". has "my father" as its focus. – BillJ Sep 23 at 9:19
  • I cannot get the first sentence, because I cannot understand how someone can especially go somewhere. For example: "I especially go to school". What could that mean? I have not idea – Dmytro O'Hope Sep 23 at 9:24
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    You're attributing the focus incorrectly. The focus is on your father, not the going. Of all the members of your family, it is your father who is most likely to go to concerts. – BillJ Sep 23 at 9:31
  • especially just means "in particular". – Fattie Sep 23 at 11:08
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When you make a generalisation, for example saying that all your family like music, you can use "especially" to add a clause that says this statement applies more to one particular party than the rest.

Consider this similar statement:

All my family likes music, especially my father.

This means that all members of your family like music to a degree, but that your father likes music more than the rest of them.

Your example is constructed slightly differently:

All my family likes music. My father, especially, goes to as many concerts as he possibly can.

This could be taken to mean that all of your family like music, including your father. Secondly, that all go to concerts, but your father goes to more concerts than the rest of them.

The alternate example that you wrote does not, therefore mean quite the same. Because you have tagged 'especially' as a clause to the first statement, it means that your father likes music more than the rest, and as a consequence of that goes to a lot of concerts.

  • Yes, though "especially my father" is not a clause, but a noun phrase serving as a supplement, with the clause "all my family likes music" as its semantic 'anchor'. – BillJ Sep 23 at 12:10

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