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You agree that all information you provide to us is true, accurate and complete, and you will maintain and update such information regularly. (https://americanmary.com/terms/)

The latter part of this sentence is not clear. Does this mean:

You agree that all information you provide to us is true, accurate and complete. And you agree that you will maintain and update such information regularly.

or

You agree that all information you provide to us is true, accurate and complete. And you will maintain and update such information regularly.

  • Per this NGram, the most common form today is true and complete, followed by accurate and complete. It's awkwardly tautological to specify both the first two (synonymous) adjectives. – FumbleFingers Sep 25 at 16:00
  • (Whether or not to "delete" repeated elements as per your examples is entirely a stylistic choice. And semantically, I don't think it makes sense to speculate on whether not explicitly repeating you agree could be interpreted as implying that aspect of the final clause was never intended in the first place.) – FumbleFingers Sep 25 at 16:01
  • Redundancy like this draws from old civil law where "true" meant not a lie, "accurate" meant objectively correct, and "complete" meant without omission. So, all three elements were necessary. Today, it is just a holdover from older times and a "just in case" for clever users wanting a loophole. – JRodge01 Sep 25 at 16:45
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It is a compound sentence, and "you agree" is being shared by both parts.

You agree that all information you provide to us is true, accurate and complete,

[You agree] you will maintain and update such information regularly.

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It is formally ambiguous, and in principle could mean either of those.

But in practice, your first meaning is either a prediction or a command, and neither of these seem to fit with the context, so it must be your second meaning.

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