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I want to write about the best websites and apps for reading in English, but I am not sure whether I put on or in, in my example below:

"I want to share the best resources to read in English in/on."

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They mean different things.

Resources in English are in the English language.

Resources on English are about the English language.

  • That means " I want to share the best resources to read in English on" is the correct one? – Abu Omar Sep 27 at 16:02
  • If the resources are both in English and about English you could say "I want to share the best resources on English, in English" or "I want to share the best resources about English, in English" – Lifelong Learner Sep 27 at 16:36
  • I don't think this answer is to the question as put. I read the question about whether it is the best resources to read [irrelevant] in or the best resources to read [irrelevant] on: it's whether you read in or on the resource, not about whethe the resource is in or on English. – Colin Fine Sep 27 at 18:35
  • @LifelongLearner More natural, I think, would be: I want to share the best English resources on English. Using English attributively means that it's written in English. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Sep 29 at 17:14
  • @AbuOmar You cannot end the sentence with either in or on. If that's what you were actually asking, then neither is grammatical. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Sep 29 at 17:15

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