0

I just saw a sentence:

It is said that history repeats itself. Meaning what we did 600 years ago might repeat itself.

Here the word meaning has been used at the beginning of the sentence.

Is it grammatical?

Can I use that means instead of meaning?

2 Answers 2

1

Yes and Yes

In this construction, the word "meaning" has exactly the same meaning as the two-word phrase "that means". It expands on and explains the previous text.

However, the quoted example using "meaning" is grammatical, and is a common and natural construction. There is no grammatical reason to avoid it. The choice is purely one of style.

3
  • How about: "You can also use this word MEANING to work hard." Is the word "meaning" used as a PARTICIPIAL PHRASE in this example?
    – user100323
    Sep 28, 2019 at 2:26
  • @user100323 that should be asked as a separate, but related question. I can't tell without more context, but I think "meaning" would be a gerund, or perhaps a present participle, in your suggested sentence. if you ask this as a new question, please provide as much context as possible. Sep 28, 2019 at 3:11
  • @David Siegel It IS to do with style, but I think starting a sentence with 'Meaning' is colloquial: not grammatically correct. Sep 28, 2019 at 8:34
1

It isn't quite grammatical. Meaning what we did 600 years ago might repeat itself is not a perfect sentence. It seems to need a main verb. For that reason That means is much better.

That means what we did 600 years ago might repeat itself.

It would flow even better if you used a colon, or perhaps just a comma, before meaning, and said 'which means'.

It is said that history repeats itself: which means what we did 600 years ago might repeat itself.

The fact that it states something blindingly self-evident makes it hard to improve!

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .