0

The ABC analysis was adopted in this study. The results of the ABC analysis were subjected to the DEF analysis.

ABC and DEF are two specific types of analysis.

I am not sure in what circumstances I can omit the definite articles. I prefer 1 and 3 because the second half of the sentence emphasizes the specific type of 'results', so I think there should be a 'the' in front. But my English-speaking friend told me that 1 and 2 are correct...

  1. The results of the ABC analysis
  2. Results of the ABC analysis
  3. The results of ABC analysis
  4. Results of ABC analysis
1

The meaning of each case is very slightly different, almost a question of emphasis.

"The results" indicates all of the results. "Results" alone indicates some of the results.

The ABC analysis indicates there is only one such analysis. Or only one was performed here. Without the word "the" it indicates a type of analysis.

So to put it together:

The results of the ABC analysis indicate that this drug is effective.
Meaning all of the results together for the single ABC analysis performed indicate the conclusion.

Results of the ABC analysis include that this drug is effective.
Meaning that some of the results of the single ABC analysis indicate the conclusion. Possibly other results of the analysis have other implications. Maybe the analysis also does things like side effects, for example.

The results of ABC analysis would indicate the level of effectiveness of this drug.
Meaning that the all the results together would indicate the effectiveness, for an analysis of that type.

Results of ABC analysis would include an indication of the level of effectiveness of this drug.
Meaning that, among the results of an analysis of the type ABC, would be the indication.

  • I don't understand this part " 'Results' alone indicates some of the results"... can you elaborate a little? In my understanding, without 'the', 'results' refers to any results. It is a general term, non-specific. – Elizabeth Oct 1 at 5:23
  • Examples are exactly what I am looking for, but I don't understand the ones you provided... can you give a little bit of context or assumptions? Thank you very much!! – Elizabeth Oct 1 at 5:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.