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In the following sentence, what would be the noun phrases?

A gift for each one of the students Jerry, Max and Tom.

I think it's:

[A gift] for each one of [the students Jerry, max and Tom]

Is this correct?

1 Answer 1

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First,

 A gift for each one of the students Jerry, Max and Tom.

is not a sentence! There is no verb. So it's a fragment or clause. What kind of fragment is it? It's a noun phrase!

Here are all of the noun phrases, indicated in your notation:

[[A gift] for [each one of [the students [[Jerry], [[Max] and [Tom]]]]]]

This looks complicated! But noun phrases often "nest" - they contain each other. Here they are listed out individually, you can look at each and verify it is actually a noun phrase:

A gift
Jerry
Max
Tom
Max and Tom
Jerry, Max, and Tom
the students Jerry, Max, and Tom
each one of the students Jerry, Max, and Tom
A gift for each one of the students Jerry, Max, and Tom

Go through this list and check that each one can function as a subject, for example with "____ is/are here":

 Max is here.
 A gift is here.

and so forth...

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