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Which tense should I use if I was on a holiday which lasted two weeks and during that time I rode a bike every day?

  1. It was a great time because I rode a bike every day. (Past Simple)
  1. It was a great time because I was riding a bike every day. (Past Continuous)
  1. It was a great time because I used to ride a bike every day. (distant past)

Personally, I would opt for Past Simple because of "every day" but on the other hand if "every day" wasn't there, I would choose Past Continuous.

But if I used Past Continuous would that mean that I only did it once?

Also, I always thought that we're supposed to use "used to" when we say something about things we don't do anymore but in my mind it was about very distant past. Now I am wondering if we can use it if it relates to something that we did on regular basis but rather recently for short period of time (like in my example, a two-week holiday)?

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  • "Used to" often implies distant past, but you don't say when the holiday was.
    – Stuart F
    Dec 15, 2022 at 9:46

2 Answers 2

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  1. It was a great time because I rode a bike everyday
  2. It was a great time because I was riding a bike everyday.
  3. It was a great time because I used to ride a bike everyday.

Out of the 3 sentences, the second sentence does not seem correct to me. Every day can not usually be used in the present, past or future continuous forms.

We usually use simple past, used to and would to talk about past habits which are no longer in use.

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  • I was practising every day, three times a day. learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/english-grammar-reference/… so past continuous and every day is possible
    – Yves Lefol
    Oct 5, 2019 at 7:23
  • If the action happens again and again but not just every day we may use past continuous. Oct 5, 2019 at 7:59
  • 1 and 3 are used to describe a regular habit, whereas 2 is used for a temporary or new habit.
    – anouk
    Apr 18, 2023 at 15:57
  • Every day can not usually be used in the present, past or future continuous forms. Yes, it can: "I ride to school every day" (Present Simple) ✅ // I'm riding a bike every day (present Continuous) ✅ // Last year I was riding my bike every day” (Past Continuous) ✅ // “In June I will be riding a bike every day to school“ Future Continuous. // ✅
    – Mari-Lou A
    Aug 16, 2023 at 13:21
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    @Mari-LouA - I also have an objection to "I'm riding my bike every day". This sounds really awkward to me. It's not logical to be currently in the process of doing something "every day", because the other days haven't happened yet. It doesn't work IMHO. There may be other contexts where it would be possible, but not this one.
    – Billy Kerr
    Aug 17, 2023 at 11:49
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1.It was a great time because I rode a bike every day.
2.It was a great time because I was riding a bike every day.
3.It was a great time because I used to ride a bike every day.

All of the above sentences are correct. You can use every day in a sentence in Past Simple or Past Continuous Tense. If you were on a holiday for two weeks and during that time you rode a bike every day, you could say one of those sentences.

The following sentence is from eslbase 1:

When I was at school I did two hours of homework every day.

The following passage is from Daily Step English 2:

It is also correct to use the Past Simple for repeated actions but we use the Past Continuous in this way when we want to emphasise the fact that something was repeated. We usually use it with a time reference such as every day, most days, for years and so on.

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