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  1. He always brushes his teeth after meals.
  2. She is often late for work.

Why in the first sentence we do not use is but in second sentence we use is?

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Generally, a sentence has to have exactly one main verb.

So:

  • "He always brushes his teeth after meals." – This is correct because it has exactly one main verb, brushes.
  • "He is always brushes his teeth after meals." – This is incorrect because it has two main verbs, is and brushes.
  • "She often late for work." – This is incorrect because it has no main verb.
  • "She is often late for work." – This is correct because it has exactly one main verb, is.

Remember that "is" is a verb but "late" is not a verb.

  • I got it. Thank you. – Serhii Oct 22 at 8:04
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He always brushes his teeth after meals

In the sentence brush is a verb and so it takes the inflection "es" as the subject is third person singular. So it does not need is which is another verb

She is often late for work

Here the main verb is be and it changes into is as the subject is third person singular(she)

For further information:

Brush is used as a transitive verb and be(is) is an intransitive state verb.

She is a teacher. she teaches English

Lucy is a teacher. She teaches Maths

It is immaterial whether the subject is noun or pronoun. The pattern of the verb changes according to the number of the subject.

Both the sentences are in the simple present

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[1] He [always brushes his teeth after meals].

[2] She is [often late for work].

These are quite different constructions. In [2] the bracketed sequence is a subject complement of the copular verb "be". It denotes a property that is ascribed to the subject "she". In this case the property is that of 'often being late for work'. Predicative complements are mostly adjective phrases or noun phrases: compare also "She is good at her job" / "very professional" / "a dedicated teacher", etc.

In [1], by contrast, there is no such association between the subject and the predicate. "Always brushes his teeth after meals" does not ascribe a property to "he"; rather, it's a verb phrase telling us about something that he always does after meals.

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