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Do I have to use the preposition about or for after negotiate.For example:

We will negotiate with the company about/for a better deal.

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I think your sentence is correct.

We will negotiate with the company for/ about a better deal

You can use either for or about in your sentence

Here is the link.

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/negotiate

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It is not idiomatic say "negotiate for/about" just as it would be incorrect to say "discuss for..."

You can discuss a topic with someone. You can negotiate a deal with someone.

Your sentence should be:

We will negotiate a better deal with the company.

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  • Does you sentence mean that we will try to get a better deal or we thnk that we will get it? – Dmytro O'Hope Oct 11 '19 at 15:22
  • @DmytroO'Hope I don't think anybody would enter into negotiations unless they were hopeful of getting a better deal. I would say that optimism is tacit in the sentence. Negotiation is a process where different opinions/suggestions are discussed. There is no guarantee of outcome suggested by the sentence. If you wanted to imply that you were less optimistic, you could say "we will try to negotiate a better deal". – Astralbee Oct 11 '19 at 15:23
  • What do you think of the sentence "We will negotiate with the company for a better deal? Does that sound ok? – Dmytro O'Hope Oct 11 '19 at 15:28
  • @DmytroO'Hope I think it is wrong. See the correct structure in my answer. – Astralbee Oct 11 '19 at 15:28
  • I am confused. Because in of the answers to my question there is an example sentence where my example is totally valid. Could you check it out please? – Dmytro O'Hope Oct 11 '19 at 15:35
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I fully agree with Lambie and Astralbee.

Which preposition do I use after the verb “negotiate”?

That depends on the context, I will explain.

Do I have to use the preposition about or for after negotiate? For example: . . .

No, you don't have to use those two all the time.

For your example sentence

We will negotiate with the company about/for a better deal.

I feel the best choice would be what Lambie and Astralbee suggested: "We will negotiate a better deal with the company." Here are a few related examples:

  • Retailers should be allowed to negotiate prices directly with producers (Cambridge).
  • The government has refused to negotiate with the terrorists (Cambridge).
  • I've managed to negotiate a five percent pay increase with my boss (Cambridge).

  • We want to negotiate a settlement that is fair to both sides (Cambridge).

Note how the focus in these examples are on the parties involved. Now let's look at the use of "for":

  • We have been negotiating for more pay (Oxford Learners Dictionary).
  • He spent ages negotiating for a pay increase, only to resign from his job soon after he'd received it (Cambridge).
  • He is negotiating for higher royalties from the record company (Cambridge).
  • I'm negotiating for a new contract (Cambridge).
  • His publishing house had just begun negotiating for her next books (Collins).
  • Coast Mountain Bus Company have delivered an overwhelming 99 percent strike mandate, after negotiations for a new collective agreement broke off (Newswire Cision).
  • The UAW [United Automobile Workers' union] is negotiating for higher wages, greater job security, and a path for temporary workers to seniority (Gmauthority).

Note how in all these examples, the focus is on what you are negotiating for and not on the parties. Also note the frequent use of "negotiating".

To sum up, in your example sentence, if you want to focus on the "deal", then you can say

"We will negotiate for a better deal" or "We will be negotiating for a better deal."

and if you want to focus on the party you are negotiating with, then say what Lambie and Astralbee suggested

"We will negotiate a better deal with the company."

The use of "about" as a proposition is more rare than the use of "for".


Edit: As Jason Bassford pointed out in the comments, the prepositions "for" and "about" become more usable in your example sentence when we change the form to "negotiation" (noun), and if we rephrase the sentence just a bit.

"(1) Our negotiations with the company are for a better deal. (2) Our negotiations with the company are about getting a better deal."

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  • I would say that negotiate a better deal focuses on the better deal. – Lambie Oct 12 '19 at 13:52
  • Note that if you use the noun negotiation, then you can use the prepositions—and about becomes much more common. (1) Our negotiations with the company are for a better deal. (2) Our negotiations with the company are about getting a better deal. – Jason Bassford Oct 12 '19 at 16:03
  • @JasonBassford Ah yes that is why I couldn't find much use of "about"; I didn't look for it with negotiations. Can I edit my answer to incorporate your comment with credit? – AIQ Oct 12 '19 at 16:08
  • @AIQ Be my guest. – Jason Bassford Oct 12 '19 at 16:09
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negotiate takes direct objects:

We will negotiate with the company about/for a better deal.

should be:

We will negotiate a better deal with the company.

That is the most idiomatic.

Any dictionary will tell you that so I am not bothering to cite one.

It is possible to say: for a better deal but in written form that is not the best choice.

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    ‘The trade unions should make this as part of their bargaining when negotiating for conditions of service with employers.’ This example is from the Oxford Dictionary. Is this sentence wrong? – Dmytro O'Hope Oct 11 '19 at 19:19
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    @DmytroO'Hope Of course it isn't wrong. It's also not a verb: it's a gerund [noun]. |make this part of their bargaining|, right? Anyway, that is a noun. Learning English is tough. learning=noun – Lambie Oct 11 '19 at 20:02
  • part of or a part of, but not: make this as part of, you miscopied. – Lambie Oct 11 '19 at 20:13
  • But what about this one from the same dictionary "We have been negotiating for more pay",? – Dmytro O'Hope Oct 11 '19 at 20:17
  • If something is in an authoritative dictionary like an Oxford Dictionary, there is no need to ask about it. – Lambie Oct 12 '19 at 13:50
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No, about and for are not the only prepositions you can use after the word negotiate.

For example, you can:

negotiate with someone/a view to (as you illustrate)
negotiate after lunch
negotiate in good time
negotiate before supper
negotiate around an issue negotiate on common ground

and so on.

It all depends on the context.

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