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Does the following sentence make sense? This doesn't seem be a grammar question.

Neither John nor I am having dinner together.

I'd appreciate your help.

  • It doesn't make sense. 'Neither' is used about each one of two things considered individually, and 'together' is used about more than one thing, considered jointly. You could say "John and I are not having dinner together (or with each other)", or "Neither John nor I is dining with the other". – Michael Harvey Oct 13 at 9:07
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It doesn't make sense. 'Neither' is used about each one of two things considered individually, and 'together' is used about more than one thing, considered jointly. You could say "John and I are not having dinner together (or with each other)", or "Neither John nor I is dining with the other".

neither
determiner, pronoun, conjunction, adverb

not either of two things or people

Neither (Cambridge Dictionary)

together
adverb

with each other

Together (Cambridge Dictionary)

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