1

I would like others to explain this to me. Which sentence is correct?

  1. In his anxiety to make himself understanding, he spoke too loudly and too slowly
  2. In his anxiety to make himself understood, he spoke too loudly and too slowly.

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-1

In his anxiety to make himself understanding, he spoke too slowly and too loudly.

In his anxiety to make himself understood, he spoke too slowly and too loudly.

In his anxiety to make himself understand, He spoke too slowly and too loudly

In the first sentence understanding is an adjective which means tolerant and so it is not suitable in the context besides being odd.

In the second sentence understood is a past participle acting as an as adjective meaning (understood to others) which is the intended meaning.

I think all the sentences are correct though the first sentence sounds odd and its use is not at all advisable, the third sentence does not fit in the context.

I think in the first sentence understanding is used as an adjective.

In the second sentence understood(past participle) used as an adjective.

In the third sentence understand is a bare infinitive and the meaning of to make himself understand suggests that he wants to understand and he is speaking for himself. So the sentence is not suitable.

I think the second sentence is what you actualy wanted to use in your context.

  • The downvoter should show me the reason for down voting – Englishmonger Oct 17 at 3:44
  • That has been discussed again and again, and will likely never be mandated. We will always have a right to downvote anonymously, and I think there are good reasons for that. Though it can be frustrating when it happens, the best course of action is to look at our answer one more time and see if we can maybe improve it some more. (Not my downvote, by the way.) – J.R. Oct 17 at 10:04
  • @J.R. You have read my answer and if you point out , I wil rectify it. – Englishmonger Oct 17 at 10:13
  • Well, I already pointed out one potential problem in an earlier comment. Perhaps you need to explain more about why the first one is "odd but correct." Most would probably consider it outright incorrect, because (a) it's probably not saying what the learner is trying to communicate, and (b) it's so non-idiomatic that I have to think for a very long time before I can even figure out how it might be considered correct. Lastly, if we were parsing it as a very unusual sentence, I think understanding might be a gerund, not an adjective – but it's such odd language that I don't know for sure. – J.R. Oct 17 at 10:17

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