2
  1. They live up in the mountains.
  2. I pinned the notice up on the wall.
  3. She went straight up to the door and knocked loudly.
  4. Lay the cards face up on the table.
  5. We're going up to New York for the day.
  6. We drove up to Inverness to see my father.
  7. I went into town to visit my friend.

It'impossible to say lots of strings of sentences without taking a breath. To know where to take a breath and that still makes the sentence sound natural, we need to split the sentence into small chunks.

In this case, all the above 7 sentences have the same structure: verb + adverb of direction ("up" or "into") + prepositional phrase, but I don't know how to split every sentence into small chunks, which also means small pauses when talking . So...

...(1) Do you put an adverb and verb into a group, when talking, to show that the adverb modifies the verb (verb + adverb/ prepositional phrase) or you would put the adverb and prepositional phrase into a group, when talking, to show that the adverb modifies the prep phrase (verb/ adverb + prep phrase)?

Note: Slash indicates a pause.

Below are the possibities of chunk splitting within each sentence below, but I'm not sure if they are correct splittings or not.

(2) Which versions of below sentences do you think makes sense and sounds more natural after they're split?

I. Sentence No.1

  1. They live/ up/ in the mountains. (This is also the same with "They live up/ in the mountains")
  2. They live/ up in the mountains.

II. Sentence No.2

  1. I pinned/ the notice/ up/ on the wall. (This is also the same with "I pinned the notice/ up/ on the wall" and "I pinned the notice up/ on the wall")
  2. I pinned the notice/ up on the wall.

III. Sentence No.3

  1. She went/ straight up/ to the door/ and knocked loudly. (This is also the same with "She went straight up/ to the door/ and knocked loudly")
  2. She went/ straight up to the door/ and knocked loudly.

IV. Sentence No.4

  1. Lay/ the cards/ face/ up/ on the table. (This is also the same with "Lay the cards face/ up/ on the table" and "Lay the cards face up/ on the table")
  2. Lay the cards face/ up on the table.

V. Sentence No.5

  1. We're going/ up/ to New York/ for the day. (This is also the same with "We're going up/ to New York/ for the day")
  2. We're going/ up to New York/ for the day.

VI. Sentence No.6

  1. We drove/ up/ to Inverness/ to see my father. (This is also the same with "We drove up/ to Inverness/ to see my father")
  2. We drove/ up to Inverness/ to see my father.

VII. Sentence No.7

  1. I went/ into/ town/ to visit my friend (This is also the same with "I went into/ town/ to visit my friend").
  2. I went/ into town/ to visit my friend.
  • While I like the fact that you put in a lot of effort writing this question (which shows your genuine interest to learn), I don't understand why you want to split them. You haven't mentioned that. Wait, are you asking when/where you should time the "pause"? – AIQ Oct 19 '19 at 2:18
  • @AIQ Yeah I mean where to pause. For example, Do you say "pin the notice up/ on the wall" or "pin the notice/ up on the wall"? (Slash indicate a pause) – Pith Oct 19 '19 at 3:47
  • You can omit the word "up" from every sentence (that has it) without changing its meaning, except "Lay the cards face up on the table" where "up" applies to the cards, not the table. As for pauses, I would not pause anywhere in the sentences, they are too short for a pause to be needed. – Weather Vane Oct 23 '19 at 18:14
1

There are two distinct questions here.

The first is about grammar (what does "up" modify?).

The second is about phonology (where to "pause" in the sentences?).

I won't fully diagram the sentences, but I will place some groups in parentheses that should be sufficient to answer your questions.

They live (up (in the mountains)).
I pinned the notice (up (on the wall)).
She went (straight (up (to the door))) and knocked loudly.
Lay the cards ((face up) (on the table)).    [this one is idiomatic!]
We're going (up (to New York)) for the day.
We drove (up (to Inverness)) to see my father.
I went (into town) to visit my friend.

You can see that the general answer is that 'up' functions prepositionally and groups into the prepositional phrase - except for in "face up" where it is in an idiomatic prepositional phrase.

The answer to the second question is going to be dialectual, but you should know that English is "stress-timed" - we don't like to pause at all most times in a clause but instead change our patterns of stress (loudness) to inflect a cadence; the stressed syllables just fill up more time (and the unstressed vowels change a little!)

In my speech (American/US/Mid-Atlantic), here are the locations of the strong (*) and weak (.) stresses:

_    _    *  _  _   *   _
They live up in the mountains.

_ *      _   *  _   *  .  _   *
I pinned the notice up on the wall.

_   _    *        .  _  _   *    _   *       *   _
She went straight up to the door and knocked loudly.

*   _   *     .    *  _  _   * _
Lay the cards face up on the table.

_     * .   *  _  _   *    _   _   *
We're going up to New York for the day.

_  *     .  _  * _  _    _  *   _  * _
We drove up to Inverness to see my father.

_ .    _ _  *    _  *  _  _  *
I went into town to visit my friend.
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