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From being great at sports to knocking it right out the park with your academics, you've done really well.

From being great at sports to knocking it right out the park on your academics, you've done really well.

From being great at sports to knocking it right out the park in your academics, you've done really well.

What's the difference in the meaning between these sentences, with respect to the preposition used? Or do they bear the same meaning? Are all the sentences grammatically correct?

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  • but, in other cases, like if someone got did a good job of something, you could complement them saying "you knocked it out of the park ON that one", here we're using on, right? Or would you suggest we use with here as well? @Lambie Oct 19 '19 at 15:55
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    It would still be with: You knocked it out of the park with that one. with that hit or shot.
    – Lambie
    Oct 19 '19 at 15:59
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How do you "knock something out of the park"? In baseball, you do it with a baseball bat.

How do you do anything in sports when a sport involves an object? (tennis racket, baseball bat, cricket bat, football, etc.), You do your thing "with those objects" Right? And I am sure it is the same idea in your language.

So, if it is used metaphorically, with a bat can be replaced by just about anything as in:

  • with your grades (academics)
  • with your presentation
  • with your comments

etc.

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  • @FumbleFingers The academics is just for the sake of the OP. In AmE, academics could mean your grades i.e. marks in BrE for courses.
    – Lambie
    Oct 19 '19 at 19:02
  • oic. I was half-inclined to understand it as equivalent to academia, in which case it would probably take the in preposition, as with He knocks it outta the park / does really well in class / in academia. Oct 20 '19 at 15:35
  • @FumbleFingers academics versus sports, for example. Suffolk University academics span more than 100 undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs of study. suffolk.edu/academics
    – Lambie
    Oct 20 '19 at 15:49
  • Sounds a bit like the way I might use [the] humanities, for example (collectively, all those "academic" subject areas that don't count as "sciences"). And I can certainly get my head around He's crap at hard science, but he knocks it outta the park in the humanities (or ...with the humanities - both versions work for me there). Oct 20 '19 at 15:55
  • @FumbleFingers academics versus athletics "My first year, I didn't play lacrosse. I just focused on my academics, and I struggled a lot." In her second year, independent.co.uk/student/student-life/… The Independent is a British publication. Enough, OK?
    – Lambie
    Oct 20 '19 at 16:03

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