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Recently I asked about

I shall come, not will

whether it could be used instead of

I will definitely come, not maybe

How I came to such a question.

Here Shall and Will Usage

I asked about "Shall I win?" pointing that it could have some variants of understanding:

1) Shall I win? = Should I win? (suggestion)

2) Shall I win? = Will I win? (archaic with 1st person)

3) Shall I win? = is it 100% that I will win? (predestination\inevitability)

The excellent guy Mixolydian said either variant was possible, that it didn't matter what person you used "shall" with, it could have this "predestination\inevitability" anyway. Out of this we're getting that nowadays we can use "will" for simple future actions and "shall" for almost predicted (almost 100% surety of happening) future actions.

If I want to say to someone:

Don't be afraid, I will come anyway.

Don't get panicked, I will definitely come

Be sure, I will come in any case

I can use "shall" for it meanining an action into which I will put 100% effort:

I shall come!

And what if my original sentence is

Don't doubt, I will definitely come, not maybe or probably

Can I use

I shall come, not will

pointing that "shall" guarantees me putting all my strengths into it while "will" doesn't give any assuarance that I will do everything to finally come.

As I understood, it wasn't very easy to ask such a question because English was different everywhere - US, UK, Australie, Ireland etc. I heard it was acceptabse to use even "thee\thou" in Ireland or somewhere like that while all other world has already forgotten such words...

  • 1
    I don't accept Fumblefinger's assertion that the emphatic 'shall' is 'hopelessly outdated'. – Michael Harvey Oct 21 at 16:35
  • Are you writing a poem or song where you "must" use those exact set of words? They don't make any sense the way they are - "I shall come, not will" and "I will definitely come, not maybe". – AIQ Oct 21 at 21:47
  • Okay, guys, I think I have to forget about "shall" word in my brain English dictionary.Originally I just wanted to say "I will definitely come, not maybe" the same as we can say "I will come to you, not to him", "I will buy a buger, not French Fries", "I will leave on Monday, not on Tuesday". I wanted to include both oppositions of the assuarance degree.If you say even "I will definitely come, not maybe" is wrong, how to say this correct but having both oppositions? – Michael Azarenko Oct 22 at 9:19
  • Do not repost questions that have been closed. Edit them to bring them on-topic. – ColleenV Oct 22 at 12:01
2

No

To a native English speaker this sounds jarring and confused. There are slightly different connotations to shall and will as you have discussed but these are not nearly enough for the phrase to not sound bizarre.

Shall and will have very similar meanings with the main difference being the level of formality.

As discussed the phrase is not grammatically incorrect and due to the slight difference between the connotations of shall and will you could argue that what you are saying makes sense.

However having done a quick survey of 8 of my native speaking friends:

  • 3 understood the idea of what was trying to be said without any prompting from myself but did not think that it sounded natural/made complete sense

  • 5 misinterpreted the idea of what was being said. 2 of these people described the sentence of meaning the exact opposite of the sentiment you were trying to convey. I.e They believed the sentence meant the speaker would endeavour to do as asked but would not make any firm commitments.

May I ask why you are so keen for this sentence to be permitted?

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    I agree with your answer. The only time I see "shall" being the preferred word is in contract language. In common speech, there isn't a difference between the two. – JRodge01 Oct 21 at 15:23
  • Originally I just wanted to say "I will definitely come, not maybe" the same as we can say "I will come to you, not to him", "I will buy a buger, not French Fries", "I will leave on Monday, not on Tuesday". I wanted to include both oppositions of the assuarance degree. If as it was said above even "I will definitely come, not maybe" was wrong, how to say this correct but having both oppositions? – Michael Azarenko Oct 22 at 9:17

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