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The following is from Emma, and I'm wondering whether there is a disconnection here; the preposition for seems to lack an object, and "thinks strongly and clearly" seems out of place, grammatically.

No doubt he is a sensible man, and I suppose may have a natural talent forthinks strongly and clearly—and when he takes a pen in hand, his thoughts naturally find proper words. It is so with some men. Yes, I understand the sort of mind. Vigorous, decided, with sentiments to a certain point, not coarse. A better written letter, Harriet (returning it,) than I had expected.”

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    What is "Emma"? – J.R. Oct 22 '19 at 11:25
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No doubt he is a sensible man, and I suppose (he) may have a natural talent for (he ) thinks strongly and clearly.

I think now the sentence becomes grammatical.

I think for is a conjunction and the subject he may have been deleted by mistake or implied.

I think Emma is a novel.

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