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I'm not so sure but I think 'a car of $30,000' simply means that the car is worth of $30,000; and 'a car for $30,000' means that somebody exchange $30,000 for a car.

What is the difference in meaning between the phrase using 'of' and the other with 'for' do you think?


Added information:

'A car of $30,000' is the phrase I made up. I'm learning about the preposition 'of' and pick up one of its usage 'used with measurements and expressions of time, age, etc.'. There are some examples for this case, like '2 kilos of potatoes, an increase of 2%, a girl of 12'. With that I think maybe the phrase 'a car of $30,000' matches the concept.

I got feedbacks from somes ell users, all of them are not with me about 'a car of $30,000'. The thing that keeps bother me is that preposition 'of' can be used to show possession, why can it not be applied in this case, 'a car of $30,000'?

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    In the first case, we would not say "a car of $30,000" but "a $30,000 car" to indicate its price tag. Oct 25 '19 at 11:23
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    It is also unsual to "exchange $30,000 for a car". We say "buy a car for $30,000." Oct 25 '19 at 11:31
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    I can't think of a case where 'a car of $30,000' would be used by a native speaker, so the question is rather moot. Oct 25 '19 at 15:32
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    I think this is a fair question, but could you tells us a bit more about "car of $30,000". Where did you find this, or how did you come up with it? That might help users better understand your problem.
    – Em.
    Oct 26 '19 at 8:22
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    Hi @Em. , I added some information about the problem I got in the question.
    – Pith
    Oct 26 '19 at 9:55
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A car “of $30,000” suggests that somehow the car was built using thirty thousand dollar bills. I suppose using paper mâché? You would say, fairly naturally, “a car of steel and rubber”:

When a man of flesh and bone meets a car of steel and rubber, at any speed, it will end in tears.

If there were a Great Depression, Jenő Rejtő's 14-carat Roadster might conceivably be a car of $30,000 in gold. But that would still be a car of gold, worth $30,000.

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