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According to this university's website, there are four types of commas: listing, joining, gapping, and bracketing comma.

In the section dedicated to bracketing commas, there's this bit:

The problem is that the interruption in this sentence is only the sequence finding them; the word and is not part of the interruption, but an essential part of the sentence.

"... an essential part of the sentence" isn't a complete sentence (so it can't be a joining comma). Nor it's a weak interruption; if you leave the part after but, half of the meaning is gone (so it can't be a bracketing comma).

Therefore, I was expecting to see this:

... the word and is not part of the interruption but an essential part of the sentence.

What kind of comma is this? Maybe the author made a mistake based on his own comma rules?

  • I agree with you. Ironic isn't it? It should be either "... is not part of the interruption, but it is an essential part of ..." or "is not part of the interruption but an essential part of " as per most guidelines. There may be those who would say the way the author used the comma is correct - note that punctuation does not affect the grammar of the sentence. It comes down to what you prefer, and what your style guide recommends. Whatever you do, just be consistent. – AIQ Nov 23 '19 at 5:52
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Ellipsis strikes again. The comma preceding "but" IS a joining comma.

The word "and" is not part of the interruption, but it is an essential part of the sentence

has been abbreviated by omitting the pronoun referencing the subject in the previous clause as understood implicitly

The word "and" is not part of the interruption, but is an essential part of the sentence

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    Ah ... but "an essential part of the sentence" is still an incomplete sentence. I think a sentence doesn't become complete by implication? – alexchenco Oct 26 '19 at 6:41

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