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I think the following sentence is not correctly framed (The highlighted part)

Jannayak Janta Party leader Dushyant Chautala on Friday said his party was ready to support any political party in the State willing to take them along with the Common Minimum Programme. He said that 75% reservation in jobs to the youth in Haryana and increase in old age pension were on top of the party’s agenda.

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Because take somebody along is the correct construction, why are they using with?

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    You haven't provided any link to the source. Are you sure there isn't a comma after willing to take them? Even if there isn't, that might be just poor proofreading. Is the text intelligible to you if you assume there should be a comma there? – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Oct 26 '19 at 16:50
  • What is the alternative to using with? "Take them along … (?) … the Common Minimum Programme." What else could go there other than with? It has the same function as I'm eating with my family tonight or I'll have a hamburger with fries. or I'll take bad with the good. – Jason Bassford Oct 27 '19 at 14:42
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The sentence is understandable if you read it as giving two conditions for supporting a politicial party.

... his party was ready to support any political party in the State [that was (1)] willing to take them [and (2) also willing to take the] Common Minimum Programme.

I assume that the "Common Minimum Program" is an important policy that is supported by the Jannayak Janta Party.

This meaning can be clarified by the use a comma. You can consider the missing comma to be a mistake in the orginal.

his party was ready to support any political party in the State willing to take them, along with the Common Minimum Programme.

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