2

My friends.

I wonder.

  1. You can either pay by cash or use a credit card.

  2. You can pay either by cash or use a credit card.

Which one is true? Thanks.

1

When you use "either", the two options that follow should be able to form complete sentences with whatever appears before the word. In your example, you have two different verbs - "pay" and "use". For this reason, I think "either" needs to go before the verb "pay":

You can either pay by cash or use a credit card.

This is the same as writing:

You can:
1. pay by cash
2. use a credit card

The two options are, therefore:

  1. You can pay by cash.
  2. You can use a credit card.

If you use the verb "pay" before you declare the options, it would be like giving the options:

  1. You can pay by cash.
  2. You can pay use a credit card. <- this makes no sense
  • 3
    Worth noting that (for the reasons above) "You can pay either by cash or credit card." also works! – Bee Oct 30 '19 at 15:30

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