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What's the difference between 'turn round' to 'turn over' for the following contexts?

Let's describe two scenarios in order to make my question properly understood:

a) A patient stand in front of a physician while his face sees the physician face. The physician wants to see the patient's nape which is located in the back side. Assuming the physician has two ways: "Please, turn round" or "Please, turn over". What's the correct one in this context?

b) A patient lays on the bed in a supine position (i.e. on the back). The physician wants to see the patient's back and he want's him in prone position (on the abdomen). Assuming the physician has two ways: "Please, turn round" or "Please, turn over". What's the correct one in this context?

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    I'd say that "turn around" is way more common that "turn round". As for the usage, if a person is standing on his feet, turning him over would probably result in a headstand. Maybe I'm wrong (I cannot support my opinion with anything), but for me turning something/someone over means rotating it along the horizontal axis (as in "flip over"), whereas turning something around results in it facing the opposite direction. Hence, you can probably turn around (or over) a lying person, but it is not advisable to turn over an upright-standing one. – voffch Oct 30 '19 at 19:21
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    That would be my understanding as well @voffch. Standing/vertical would be turn (a)round. Laying down/horizontal would be turn over. – Havegooda Oct 30 '19 at 21:27
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Imagine a dog facing you. You and the dog are face-to-face. The dog is standing normally. If the dog turns around, its butt is now facing you and you're looking at its butt. If the dog **turns over*, it is now showing its belly to you and you're looking at its belly, so rub the belly!

"Turn round" is not super common. "Turn around" is often used instead.

In your case:

a) turn round
b) turn over

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