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As I looked at my dictionary, "confirm" is a transitive verb and it's followed by a noun (e.g I confirm my attendance) or that clause (e.g I confirm (that) I will join the meeting) as its direct object. However, I do not find gerund or to infinitive as its direct clause.

Is what i said correct? and are there any other verbs like that?

Thanks for your replies!

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    No: you have it wrong. A verb is transitive if it has a direct object. There are many verbs that can be trans or intrans, and "confirm" is one of them. In "I confirm my attendance", it has "my attendance" as direct object and hence is transitive. But in "I confirm that I will join the meeting", the that clause_ is not direct object and hence "confirm " is intransitive. Note that clauses do not function as objects, and there is no such thing as a 'noun clause'. – BillJ Oct 31 '19 at 8:36
  • @BillJ - this is the answer, you should write it up as one. – KrisW Oct 31 '19 at 9:20
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[1] I confirm [my attendance].

[2] I confirm [that I will join the meeting].

Preliminary point: A verb is only transitive if it actually has a direct object in the clause that contains it.

There are many verbs that can be trans or intrans, and "confirm" is one of them. In [1] "confirm" has the noun phrase my attendance" as direct object and hence is transitive. But in [2] the that clause is complement of "confirm", not direct object, and hence "confirm " is intransitive.

Some (but not all) verbs can take gerund-participials or infinitivals as complement. These are called 'catenative' verbs, and the clauses that contain them are called catenative constructions. But the clausal complements are not objects, but catenative complements.

For example, in I regret locking the door, "regret" is a catenative verb, and the gerund-participial clause "locking the door" is its catenative complement, not direct object. Similarly, in I want to see a doctor, "want" is a catenative verb, and the infinitival clause "to see a doctor" is catenative complement, not direct object.

Note that with only a very few exceptions, clauses do not function as objects.

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  • BillJ: I'm collecting verbs that are only followed by a direct object or a "that clause". Except "confirm", how can i seek for others? can you help me list some? – Hoàng Trần Huy Nov 1 '19 at 7:28
  • @HoàngTrầnHuy I can't give you a list. Have you looked on the 'Net or in a good grammar book? – BillJ Nov 2 '19 at 13:09
  • BillJ: thank you for your help! – Hoàng Trần Huy Nov 4 '19 at 9:25

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