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In texts (books, tutorials, etc) when we want to express an action that will happen in the text itself, such as giving instructions or explaining a subject, should we use will or going to?

In this book we are going to learn how to develop a software.

In this tutorial I will show you how you can fix the most common car problems.

This is the tool we are going to use in our tutorial and I will call it a lifesaver.

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All three of your examples are correct, apart from the extra "a" in the first one (... how to develop software.).

The phrases are almost interchangeable. You may need to modify the text slightly, for example

In this book I will show you how to develop software.

In this tutorial we are going to learn how you can fix the most common car problems.

This is the tool I will use in our tutorial and we are going to call it a lifesaver.

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Peter Jennings' answer sufficiently addresses your concern. I will just add a few things that may help.

If you want, you can omit using "I" and "we" and use the resource as the object. This will allow you to cut down on words, and allow the reader to get to the point faster.

In this book we are going to learn how to develop software.

- This book demonstrates how to develop software.

If specific chapters in the book does that, then you can say

Chapters 3 and 4 demonstrates how to develop ...

Chapter 5 discusses how you can develop ...

Feel free to swap other relevant verbs in there.

In this tutorial I will show you how you can fix the most common car problems.

- This tutorial shows how you can fix the most common car problems.

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