0

With brains come senses, to detect whether the world is good or bad, and a memory.

Does it briefly mean "Brain, senses and memory come together ..."?

If so, is this grammatically correct?

Would you please explain it to me?

The fuller text:

With brains come senses, to detect whether the world is good or bad, and a memory. Together, these let the animal monitor in real time whether things are getting better or worse. This in turn allows a simple system of prediction and reward. Even animals with really simple brains – insects, slugs or flatworms – can use their experiences to predict what might be the best thing to do or eat next, and have a system of reward that reinforces good choices.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn9951-top-10-lifes-greatest-inventions/#faq3

1 Answer 1

1

Does it briefly mean "Brain, senses and memory come together ..."?

No, it means

There are two things that come with brains: (1) senses and (2) a memory.

The writer adds important information to senses. The purpose of senses is

to detect whether the world is good or bad.

That is just a nonrestrictive or nonessential clause. If you remove it, the sentence still makes sense and the meaning is unchanged.

With brains come (1) senses and (2) a memory.

The sentence is grammatical. But I don't particularly like the use of "come" in it. It could be worded differently to make it easy to understand (e.g., "Brains have two elements: senses and a memory" or "Brains come with senses and a memory"). But that is a matter of style, I think.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .