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Could you please help me understand this bold sentence? Or rephrase it? It's difficult for me to understand this part of the sentence word by word. I think that the author says the Simpsons screenwriters were using something like deus ex machina to fix their plot holes.

It’s not incidental that all three of those examples involve Homer. Season 9 saw the show drop him into any situation on the flimsiest of pretenses. He flies to Cuba with Mr. Burns. He climbs the tallest mountain in the world. He crashes Moe’s car into a river to collect the insurance money, swims out from the depths, and then breaks out of jail. Those episodes don’t so much have plot holes as they do plot canyons, where things that make no sense are either studiously ignored or conjured out of nowhere to drag things to a resolution.

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    "I think that the author says the Simpsons screenwriters were using something like deus ex machina to fix their plot holes." - You got it. – Michael Harvey Nov 8 at 18:30
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A "resolution" is a way of finishing a story in a satisfying way. The problems set up in the story are solved in the resolution.

If a story is "dragged to a resolution" then reaching the resolution is difficult.

"Conjuring out of nowhere" describes a magic trick where the magician creates something by magic. For example the magician might make a rabbit appear in his hat "out of nowhere". Here it is used metaphorically: things that make no sense (in the context of the story) happen to drag the story to a resolution.

As you say "the author says the Simpsons screenwriters were using something like deus ex machina to fix their plot holes."

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