1

I have read the following sentence:

We'll be disappointed if the weather isn't nice the day of our party.

Isn't "on" required here before "the day" ? I think this question also applies to the weekdays, eg:

He'll come home Friday.

2

This kind of thing can vary by (English-speaking) country, and even by region. Your first sentence would be idiomatic pretty much anywhere, but the second sounds more American English-esque to my (British) ears. If I'd written, "He'll come home Friday" in an English high school essay, I suspect I'd have lost a mark.

Something similar can sometimes be seen with the verb "to write". So the following form is common in the US:

...if they advertise for bids at that time I will write you.

However, in the UK that would more likely appear as:

...if they advertise for bids at that time I will write to you.

although most Brits would probably be OK with:

...if they advertise for bids at that time I will write you a note.

0

I think you have discovered that "on" is not always required when giving a day. The word "Friday" is normally a noun, but it can (sometimes) function as an adverb.

The function of "the day of our party" is also functioning as an adverb. It is rather unusual in written English. It is quite common enough in spoken English.

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