0

I am confused, when to put helping verb at end and when to omit it.

  1. She is more beautiful than I.

  2. She is more beautiful than I am.

  3. I am better adapted to the environment than you.

  4. I am better adapted to the environment than you are.

Which sentences are correct? I think sentence cannot end with an object in such cases. For example, "She is better than me". It should be I and not me according to grammar rule.

0

The simplest expression would be

She is more beautiful than me.

(The final pronoun is being not heading a clause so it can take the default "me" form)

However it is equally correct to say

... than I. (formal, slightly old fashioned)

... than I am. (correct but the repetition of the verb is not needed)

There are times when the full comparison is needed to avoid ambiguity

You like cake more than your mum!

This could be understood in two ways. Does this mean "You like cake more than you like your mum." or "You like cake more than your mum likes cake."? Both are possible. The first is an insult, but the second is a common observation.

There is no possiblity of ambiguity in the examples you give, so the full comparison is redundant in those cases, but it is not incorrect.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.