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  1. They would often visit friends in Europe.
  2. They often visited friends in Europe.
  • It's best if you say what you understand, and what you want help with. For example, one sentence uses the past tense ("visited"). Do you have a question about how that changes the meaning of the sentence? – user8356 Nov 12 at 15:22
  • yeah, downvote me so I'll never know the difference. I used google translator and it translates them to the same sentence in my language – J. Kowalski Nov 12 at 15:23
  • The meaning is very similar, that's why I asked. I don't downvote questions. The short answer might be, there really is no difference, it says that "some people visit Europe" more than once to see friends there. – user8356 Nov 12 at 15:25
  • @user8356 google translate says this two sentences mean the same but I'm not so sure. I never encounter a sentence built like the first one. I know that both of them relate to the past. But do they really mean the same? – J. Kowalski Nov 12 at 15:26
  • @user8356 I'm confused because I thought 'would' is used to show someone's purposes – J. Kowalski Nov 12 at 15:28
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//They would often visit friends in Europe. They often visited friends in Europe.//

Compare these two:

They said, "We will often visit friends in Europe." They said that they would often visit friends in Europe. (This cannot be replaced by 'They often visited friends in Europe.)

They said, "We often visit friends in Europe." They said that they often visited friends in Europe. (This cannot be replaced with 'They would often visit friends in Europe.)

Meaning-wise there is not much a difference. Both are habitual actions of the past.

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