0

Which one is correct Example. Mark ate all the chocolate when I got home . There was nothing left .

Mark had eaten all the chocolate when I got home . There was nothing left . Thanks

  • 3
    Why are you thanking Mark for eating all the chocolate? – David Nov 12 '19 at 19:38
2

Mark ate all the chocolate when I got home. There was nothing left.

This says that Mark waited for you to get home before he then proceeded to eat ALL of the chocolate. The act of eating the chocolate happened AFTER or at the moment you got home.

I think the confusion is occurring because both the act of eating the chocolate and the time when you are describing the act are in the past but independent of each other.

While the verb 'ate' is the past simple of eat, "Mark ate..." is past tense - for example, "he ate the thing yesterday" - you are also describing the event in the past, after it has happened.

Mark had eaten all the chocolate when I got home. There was nothing left.

You are still describing something that happened in the past but this is slightly different, it that it says: "Mark had already eaten ALL of the chocolate BEFORE you got home, but the result is the same...

"Mark had eaten..." is present perfect tense.

The present perfect tense refers to an action or state that occurred, either:

  • At an indefinite time in the past (e.g., we have talked before), or
  • Began in the past and continued to the present time (e.g., he has grown impatient over the last hour). The reference is the present day.

This tense is formed by have/has + the past participle.

"eaten" is a past participle--not a verb

  • I would like to know whether Mark had eaten is a present perfect or past perfect. I would like to know why the use of present perfect was dicussed by the user who answered the question – successive suspension Nov 13 '19 at 7:30
  • 1
    It is a past perfect. NeilB wrongly identifies it as present perfect, and then goes on to explain uses of the present perfect (not in the way I would do so). His explanation of the specific example is appropriate, though. – Colin Fine Nov 13 '19 at 17:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy