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I would like to know the difference in meaning between "go into" and "go inside".

Here are a couple of sentences.

  1. The boys went into the room.
  2. The boys went inside the room.

I know in the first sentence "went into" means "entered" and it's being used the preposition of movement "into". But what about the second sentence?
Is it correct?
What is it expressing?
What's the difference in meaning between these two sentences?

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"Inside" places more emphasis on the fact that the boys are now inside of something, and also places more direct emphasis on the room as a physical place, as oppose to it being considered more conceptually.

It naturally includes awareness of its opposite, "outside". It would therefore be a bit odd to use "went inside the room" if they had only come from another room. However, if the new room had some quality that the other room lacked, let's say it was much warmer or colder, or something like that, using "inside" would place some emphasis on that.

I feel that "inside" naturally suggests some kind of change, something different from "outside".

We could perhaps also say that "into" provides a contrast to its opposite, "out of", and therefore places more emphasis on the actual entering of the room.

1

The boys went into the room. = The boys entered the room.

Generally, we would not say go inside the room unless, for example, the room was hidden behind a secret panel. Or, if you want to refer to inside and outside the room. They stayed inside the room upstairs while the robbers stole the money downstairs.

The inside of the room or house was dark.

Rooms are generally part of a larger unit.

go inside refers to an entire building or house or apartment:

  • We did not go inside the house, we stayed outdoors. [the house is a unit, not broken up into rooms by the speaker]

go inside a house/go outside (of) a house, where the house is a unit

go into/go out of a room [in a house or building].

But we also say: go into and out of the building.

go into=to enter versus go out of=leave a space

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