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which one is correct, please help me? to know what is this "one person has a first level volunteer license because he spent 100 hours as a volunteer." He wants to write this in his resume.

" Holds a first-level volunteer license with 100-hour volunteers '

"Has a first-level volunteer license with 100-hour volunteers"

"Holds a first-level volunteer license by 100-hour volunteers "

"Has a first-level volunteer license by 100-hour volunteers"

If none of these correct, please give me the right one.

  • Please give us the context. What are you referring to? And which one do you think is correct? – Ronald Sole Nov 16 '19 at 19:23
  • one person holds a first-level volunteer license with 100-hour volunteers which is provided by a company. @RonaldSole – user70732 Nov 16 '19 at 20:07
  • my main question is about " l00 hour volunteer" is it correct to use "by, with or up to"? – user70732 Nov 16 '19 at 20:13
  • There's more than that wrong with this. What is "100-hour volunteers" in the first place? – Daniel Roseman Nov 16 '19 at 20:15
  • that's why I ask a question. he has a first level volunteer license because he spent 100 hours as a volunteer. @DanielRoseman – user70732 Nov 16 '19 at 20:47
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I think your comments make it clear that the person has something called a "first-level volunteer license", and the person has also spent 100 hours as a volunteer, i.e. he has volunteered 100 hours of his time.

I haven't myself heard of a "first-level volunteer license", and I'm not sure whether it is defined by the 100 hours of volunteer time, or if those are two independent qualifications (the license and the time).

But since you don't offer other alternatives to the expression "first-level volunteer license", I'll assume that is the correct official name of the license.

If a person spends 100 hours volunteering his time, we would say he has performed (or "done", or maybe "worked") "100 volunteer-hours".

So you could say:

"Holds a first-level volunteer license with 100 volunteer-hours"

"Has a first-level volunteer license with 100 volunteer-hours"

or

"Has/holds a first-level volunteer license and has performed 100 hours of volunteer service"

There are many other possibilities depending on the terminology used in this field. If people ever used the expression "100-hour volunteers" in English, they would probably be describing people who have volunteered 100 hours.

So you might even be able to say,

"Holds a first-level volunteer license as a 100-hour volunteer"

This would mean that he had that license, and he was a 100-hour volunteer, assuming "100-hour volunteer" is a commonly used term in the field in question.

  • thanks a lot! How about "Holds a first-level, volunteer license as a 100-hour volunteer – user70732 Nov 17 '19 at 15:44
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    This really depends on the way the people in this field use their specialized terminology. As a layman unfamiliar with this jargon, I would not think a comma was needed between "first-level" and "volunteer" because "first-level" sounds (to me) like an adjective describing the compound noun "volunteer license". That's what I think, but I don't even know what occupation is being discussed here. – Lorel C. Nov 17 '19 at 15:49
  • I see. Me too. Thanks! – user70732 Nov 17 '19 at 16:06
  • umm, How about "Holds a first-level volunteer license by a 100-hour volunteer"? – user70732 Nov 17 '19 at 16:11
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    My opinion: no. When you use the word "by" to introduce this "100-hour volunteer", it makes it sound like the "100-hour volunteer" is some other person. If you use "as", you imply that the subject (who "holds" that license) holds it as a 100-hour volunteer. In other words, there is only one person: "he holds the license." In what way does he hold it? "As a 100-hour volunteer." If you use "by" it sounds like you are introducing a whole new person. I.e. confusing – Lorel C. Nov 17 '19 at 16:52

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