2
  1. Daniel the golfer visited this place yesterday.
  2. Daniel, the golfer, visited this place yesterday.

If two Daniels, one of whom is a swimmer and the other is a golfer, visited the place yesterday, should commas dropped to use "the golfer" as essential information and to refer to who the writer is referring to? I suppose so. If there was only one Daniel, who visited the place, I think 2 is the only correct sentence. Am I right?

  • Yes, you are right. – AIQ Nov 17 '19 at 9:12
  • @AIQ I'm not sure whether I'm really right because I once heard that only the second one is correct regardless of the situation. – Glittering river Nov 17 '19 at 9:17
  • If there is just one Daniel (who is a golfer) then the "golfer" bit will go in as additional information and be within a pair of commas (no. 2). If there are two or more people named Daniel (and you and the listener both know them) then use the "golfer" bit with no commas - as restrictive information. – AIQ Nov 17 '19 at 9:23
  • SinK, I remember writing an elaborate answer on this for you. Did you not find that helpful? If not, you could write a comment in that question's answer, and I will edit it to clarify your doubts. – AIQ Nov 17 '19 at 9:25
  • @AIQ No, that was really helpful and as for this question, we're on the same page. But.. I have never actually seen when a person's name first put, "the + Noun" is attached to the person's name behind it without commas setting off "the + Noun". This seems to be a case different from the case we the other day once dealt with. – Glittering river Nov 17 '19 at 9:32
1

Let's get the easy part out of the way.

Daniel, the golfer, visited this place yesterday. {there is just this one Daniel}

In no.2, the noun phrase "the golfer" is the appositive, and "Daniel" is the noun in apposition. The appositive noun phrase - "the golfer" - is nonessential or additional information.

"A non-restrictive appositive provides information not critical to identifying the phrase in apposition. It provides non-essential information, and the essential meaning of the sentence would not change if the appositive were removed." - Wikipedia

You would say

Daniel visited this place yesterday.

to your friend if your friend knows that there is just one Daniel. The non-restrictive appositive, "the golfer", just provides additional information.

If you and your friend knows more than one Daniel, your friend will ask "Which Daniel?" So, you need to identify Daniel with the restrictive appositive.


This is where your question comes in.

From what I understand, you are asking, "If there are two or more people named Daniel, then which is the correct construction of the restrictive appositive - is it A or B?"

A. Daniel the golfer visited this place yesterday.

B. The golfer Daniel visited this place yesterday.

If one Daniel is a golfer, and the other Daniel is a swimmer, then you should say

a. Daniel the golfer visited this place yesterday. {"the golfer" is the restrictive appositive that is identifying the right Daniel}

That is because the focus is on "Daniel". You need to tell your friend which "Daniel" visited the place, as opposed to which "golfer" visited the place. If you and your friend are talking about a number of golfers, then you should say

b. The golfer Daniel visited this place yesterday. {"Daniel" is the restrictive appositive that is identifying the right golfer}

Compare (b) with this

"The renowned poet and historian K. Lester scheduled a six-city tour for April. ("K. Lester" is not the world’s only renowned poet and historian.)" - CMoS 6.28 (17th Ed)

Consider the following examples:

  1. The accountant Mary just got fired. {"Mary" is identifying which accountant got fired - there are 3 accountants}

  2. Mary the accountant just got fired. {"the accountant" is identifying which Mary got fired - there are 5 ladies named Mary in the office, but there's just one accountant}

Here are some other examples:

"John Kennedy the popular US president was quite different from John Kennedy the unfaithful husband." - Purdue

"John the blacksmith chews gum." - Appositives

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