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I want to begin a sentence with 'All said put aside, [...]'. Google can't find one single instance of using this phrase. What can I use instead?

And what's grammatically wrong with it (if anything)? 'All the said put aside' gives the same nothing on Google.

'Nevertheless' and other options, such as 'that said', serve best when there's an opposition or some sort of contradiction with just one or two previous sentences. In my case, there are many sentences, that's why I want to bring in the pronoun 'all'. I'm seeking to clearly separate one group of sentences from the other without starting a new paragraph. There's even not much contradiction. It's something more like "this group of things has this purpose, but this particular thing also has this specific purpose".

  • That phrase is not grammatical. As you have not explained what you're trying to say or given any additional information or context, I've voted to close the question. – TypeIA Nov 17 at 14:03
  • What's wrong with it grammatically? That's the kind of a sentence I imply, 'Broccoli smells bad. Broccoli tastes terrible. All said put aside (putting everything just said out of the equation), it's good for your health'. I know the phrases 'that said', 'having said that', I know the word 'nevertheless', but I need something different – Sergey Zolotarev Nov 17 at 20:31
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    Why do you need something different? In hindsight I think it may be no less grammatical than "That aside, ..." but the things you mentioned in your comment are the expressions we use, whereas the version in your question is not and sounds extremely strange at best. The alternatives in your comment are the ones I would suggest. If there's something wrong with them in your specific case you will need to explain why in more detail. Otherwise I'm afraid a real answer is not possible. – TypeIA Nov 17 at 21:10
  • 'Nevertheless' and other options serve best when there's an opposition or some sort of contradiction with just one or two previous sentences. In my case, there are many sentences, that's why I want to use 'all'. I'm seeking to clearly separate one group of sentences from the other without starting a new paragraph. There's even not much contradiction. It's something more like "This group of things has this purpose, but this particular thing also has this specific purpose" – Sergey Zolotarev Nov 18 at 7:25
  • Reopen 8 more to go... – Sergey Zolotarev Nov 22 at 20:50
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I don't see anything wrong with that phrase, and I did find a reference online that uses:

With all said put side

I was surprised not to find more references online, but then again, I do feel this is a phrase that is much more likely to be spoken than written. It effectively represents quite a major shift in thinking or context, such that it would perhaps seem a bit odd in writing, but much less so in a more dynamic conversational setting.

As you are looking to use this in writing, it would really depend on the context as to what would be appropriate, so I'd need to actually read the paragraph to make a judgment. One thing that comes to mind is that it might be a good idea to be more specific on what the reader is to put aside (as I don't think a reader would naturally infer that it's all prior statements within the current paragraph), but again, it would depend on the context.

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