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Which adjective would be suitable right after "too" to describe a piece of text that took too much space in a document?

Your descriptions are very clear, but too _________ .

or

Your descriptions came out too ____________ .

(using "big" sounds a bit blunt to me)

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My answer is based on the assumption that the text is not concise and has too much information (i.e., it has something to do with the content). I am not sure if it is a matter of "space" which has more to do with reducing font size, changing fonts, reducing line spacing, etc.

It should be

Your descriptions are very clear, but it's (= the chapter/section/argument) too _________ .

or

Your descriptions are very clear, but they are (= the descriptions/arguments) too _________ .

One option is to use "verbose". This may require slight changes to your sentence.

From Cambridge

Verbose (adj): using or containing more words than are necessary - a verbose explanation/report/speech/style

If you rephrase your sentence, you can use the noun too.

verbosity (n): the quality of being verbose (= using too many words)

  • Knowing they wouldn't welcome too much verbosity, he simplified his talk.
  • The message is clear and concise and displays no verbosity.

You can also say "this section is too wordy" or "this section is too long".

  • Thanks. Can you explain, please, why I can't jump directly to "too" right after "but"? In other words, why should I say "it's" or "they are" first? – brilliant Nov 18 '19 at 5:05
  • That is because of the comma before the conjunction. If you have a comma there, then the next clause needs a subject. Those are two independent sentences - (1) "Your descriptions are very clear" and (2) "These descriptions are too wordy". When you put them together, you get - "Your descriptions are very clear, but they are too wordy". Without the comma, you don't need a subject in the second clause - "Your descriptions are very clear but too wordy". This is not a rule. Its just a guideline. In a compound sentence, if the independent clauses are small, then the comma can be dropped. – AIQ Nov 18 '19 at 5:45
  • See this Comma Before And – AIQ Nov 18 '19 at 5:46
  • WOW! Thank you. Very informative. – brilliant Nov 18 '19 at 6:05

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