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Can we summarize the various uses of Verb+ed in the English sentence, as it is used to describe completed actions in Present, Past and future, Whether verb+ed is used as past tense or past participle.

e.g. I have used Verb Cleaned in various sentences to understand completed action.

a) Xyz Cleaned the car.

b) Xyz has/had cleaned the car.

b) The car is/was cleaned by xyz.

c) The car has been/had Been cleaned by xyz.

e) The car will be cleaned by xyz.

d) A Cleaned car.

e) If xyz cleaned car. I would go for drive.

If My understanding is correct then what for Verb+ed is used in below sentences? Does it indicate completed actions?

a) This festival is celebrated every year.

b) You will be accompanied by security.

c) It has remained static whole year.

d) As government formation is concerned it has shown that....

e) government is so focused on the country’s image

To conclude Verb+ed can be used as Past Tense & Past Participle. Past Tense is Used to describe past completed action and Past Participle is used to describe completed action in Past, Present and future with use of Auxiliaries.

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Yes, they have similar meanings here too.

a) This festival is celebrated every year.

"Celebrated" references the moment after the celebrations are complete; it's a projection to future points in time

b) You will be accompanied by security.

This again references a future point in time. Security will accompany you, and following that, the accompaniment will be complete.

c) It has remained static whole year.

Here, the "it" has been remaining static throughout the year, and at the current time, we say the remaining is complete (though may continue). "Remain" is a relatively passive verb, but it applies here nonetheless.

d) As government formation is concerned it has shown that....

Government formation has gone through the process of concerning itself with something, and now the concerning is complete.

e) government is so focused on the country’s image

Government has gone through the process of focusing on something, and now the focusing is complete.

  • @ Chris Mack....Thanks for answering.... To conclude Verb+ed can be used as Past Tense & Past Participle. Past Tense is Used to describe past completed action and Past Participle is used to describe completed action in Past, Present and future. – user4084 Nov 21 at 4:37
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The question seems to be whether the perfective aspect (completion) is involved in the above examples.

The short answer is no.

  1. About Concern.

Generally concern is stative.

This is addressed in at least one question already: Correct use of stative verbs

In statements about the condition of the mind, concern is more a description of state than it is an action to be considered complete or incomplete.

However your example specifically is idiomatic.

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/60108/is-so-far-as-concerns-something-the-same-as-so-far-as-something-is-concerned/60172#60172

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/so+far+as+is+concerned

So concern is either stative or idiom.

  1. Legitimate Use of the Simple Past.

The preterite or simple past is not always expressing the perfective aspect. Neither is completeness nor telicity implied. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preterite

In English clearly expressing the end of an action or referring to an action that can easily be judged complete or incomplete—that will probably involve the perfective aspect or telicity.

Alice killed Bob.

On the other hand English and other Germanic languages can express imperfective aspect or an atelic sense via prepositions, such as on.

Examples:

I worked on the paper.
I built on the house.  

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telicity

In any event we should be able to agree that merely employing the English simple past does not allow the inference of completeness.

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