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Is there any difference in meaning between the following sentences.

Don't throw your boots away yet because you will need them.

Don't throw your boots away yet because you will be needing them.

I cannot feel any difference. But I am sure there is some because why would anyone say I will be needing when I will need is shorter.

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    Every time I have seen the form "will be needing", it is used to say that something will be needed very soon (i.e., a specific occasion is mentioned or suggested). On the other hand, "will need" can be said if something will be of use after 40 years or very soon. Of course, that is a very limited observation and there may be more reasons. – AIQ Nov 21 '19 at 18:40
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Let's look at it by changing the verb and the context.

Don't put your boots away yet because you will wash them.

Don't put your boots away yet because you will be washing them.

This makes it a bit more clearer I feel, as the first sentence doesn't really make any sense.

Using the "be" form suggests a definite future event to come.

With regards to "need", I feel the "you will need them" form, implies, not a single future event, but a more general sense of needing them for the future. To me it feels like it represents a presumption (i.e. with no definite future event in mind), but one that is generally accepted as being reliable, at least in the mind of the person who says it; it's a "goes without saying" thing.

For example:

You'll need them for the winter.

Sounds a lot more natural than:

You'll be needing them for the winter.

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