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Is it correct to say: "Have you ever been going on a trip to London without your parents before?" or is is better to say "Have you gone on a trip to London without your parents before??"

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    I would say "Have you ever been to London without your parents?" You dont need both ever and before. Nov 27, 2019 at 19:11
  • Sometimes the "before" is necessary. Suppose I am a tourist in London, speaking to a local. They ask me "Have you ever been to London before?", and I respond "No! This is my first time here!". However if they omit the "before", they sound perhaps a little bit insane, no?
    – BadZen
    Nov 27, 2019 at 21:29
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    @BadZen I would ask "Have you been to London before?" Nov 27, 2019 at 22:07

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Have you ever been going on a trip to London without your parents before?

^ That is incorrect use, but a listener will understand what you mean.

Have you gone on a trip to London without your parents before?

^ That is correct use and sounds natural.

Have you been on a trip to London without your parents before?

^ That is also correct and identical in meaning.

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  • Have you ever been going is used this way. Have you ever been going somewhere on a train and the train derails?
    – EllieK
    Jan 11, 2021 at 15:01
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"Have you gone …?" uses the simple past tense to indicate a simple, completed action. The question will be about that action. It would be appropriate for the given question.

"Have you ever been going …?" uses a past tense (present perfect continuous) indicating that the action is still in progress. It establishes the context for the real question, which will be about something that happened while you were going. For instance, "Have you ever been going … and suddenly thought that you left your luggage at the station?". It would not be appropriate for the given question.

See Verb Tenses—–How to Use Them Correctly | Grammarly for a handy chart.

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The present perfect tense is used for two main purposes.

  1. To describe an action that happened at an unknown time in the past
  2. To describe an action that started happening in the past and continued until the present.

I think the following

Have you gone on a trip to London without your parents before

is correct. Because of the time reference "before", means happened at an unknown time in the past, and the action happens there is go on a trip.

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