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English is so flexible, there are too many ways to express "hurt"

[transitive, intransitive] hurt (somebody/something/yourself) to cause physical pain to somebody/yourself; to injure somebody/yourself

He hurt his back playing squash.

Did you hurt yourself?

Stop it. You're hurting me.

My back is really hurting me today.

Strong light hurts my eyes.

My shoes hurt—they're too tight.

hurt [intransitive] to feel painful

My feet hurt.

Ouch! That hurt!

It hurts when I bend my knee.


hurt (adj) injured physically

None of the passengers were badly hurt.

Let's say you are playing with your child and then she says "I am hurt". What are your response?

Where does it hurt?

Where do you hurt?

What hurts you?

What hurts?

Where are you hurt?

Where is it hurt?

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  • [Where is it hurt? That would refer to an animal for example. Buzzer] – Lambie Nov 29 '19 at 14:45
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    I don't think many native speakers would often say I am hurt when they mean I'm [physically] injured. That particular phrasing is far more likely to carry the somewhat more metaphorical sense of My feelings have been hurt. To which an appropriate response might be I'm really sorry if I have upset you (assuming you really do regret whatever hurtful thing you did or said). But "What's an appropriate response" is far too open-ended to be a sensible question here on ELL. – FumbleFingers Nov 29 '19 at 15:08
  • @FumbleFingers, I saw this movie "the-knight-before-christmas" when the girl Vanessa Hudgens hit the man while driving her car, she got off & said: Are you ok? I couldn't see anything Are you hurt? springfieldspringfield.co.uk/… – Tom Nov 29 '19 at 16:52
  • @Tom: I never suggested that Are you hurt? wasn't a "natural" way of asking if someone has been injured. But to be honest, if the addressee replied with Yeah, I am hurt I might still interpret that as (facetiously?!) meaning I'm not physically hurt, but my feelings are. There are several written instances of “Was she hurt?” “Not physically.” in Google Books. – FumbleFingers Nov 29 '19 at 17:57
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English speakers do not tend to say "I am hurt" as a response to physical pain.

"I am hurt" tends to refer to emotional hurt, ie hurt feelings.

A more idiomatic way to express that you have been hurt, certainly in British English, would be "I hurt myself", or to specifically name the body part you hurt, for example, "I hurt my hand".

However, all of your suggested responses seem perfectly fine.

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  • I saw this movie "the-knight-before-christmas" when the girl Vanessa Hudgens hit the man while driving her car, she got off & said: Are you ok? I couldn't see anything Are you hurt? springfieldspringfield.co.uk/… – Tom Nov 29 '19 at 16:53
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    @Tom Yep, "are you hurt" is often asked, but I can't explain why "I am hurt" - at least without further context - is not usually used for physical hurt. – Astralbee Nov 30 '19 at 15:23

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