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I am wondering when we put commas, because in most situations after a conjunction we don't put a comma.

Example:

This must be true or at least truer than the last proposition.

However, we may have a longer sentence.

This must be true or at least, excluding some of the recent findings, truer than the last proposition.

Do we put a comma after findings and before excluding or not?

This must be true or at least excluding some of the recent findings truer than the last proposition.

  • "In most situations after a conjunction we don't put a comma." That's only true of conjunctions with two items, and where it's the simple conjunction of two nouns. If you join two clauses together, a comma very often is used. – Jason Bassford Dec 10 '19 at 8:15
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The usage of commas in the second sentences is correct, not because of the conjunction, but because the words they enclose are a parenthesis in the sentence.

A parenthesis is an "explanatory word, phrase, or sentence inserted in a passage from which it is usually set off by punctuation". The punctuation in use is often commas, but may also be dashes or brackets.

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  • What about the third sentence? – tonimation Dec 1 '19 at 18:06
  • Omitting the commas makes this sentence difficult to parse. It is recommended to use punctuation. – laugh salutes Monica C Dec 1 '19 at 19:18
  • The third sentence is overly complex for most writing environments. I’d strongly suggest breaking it into multiple smaller sentences unless you are writing in a deliberately obtuse style (e.g. some academic writing). – jwpfox Nov 25 at 1:34
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It depends on how the sentence is constructed. It is not necessary to put comma before "and". Putting comma before "and" is called Oxford comma.

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  • Usage of Oxford commas is required in some style guides and forbidden in some others. You need to follow the style that applies to the environment you are writing for. – jwpfox Nov 25 at 1:31

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