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Which of the following sentences is/are correct?

Is it just me or you guys too who are getting the notifications from WWE?

Is it just me or you guys too who is getting the notifications from WWE?

Is it just me or you guys too getting the notifications from WWE?

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Who wrote this? If it is your sentence, I kindly suggest you rewrite it.

If you are consciously asking the question specifically with these examples (perhaps in order to clarify some point about a particular construct?) I would still counsel against it. Instead we should try to form another question—-an entirely different question—-if that is your goal.

As for agreement modern English always has Is it x who are/is...? in the present indicative active for this type of question. For plural use who are. For singular use who is. The only exception is when you suspect that you yourself might be doing something that you do not currently have full knowledge of.

Then use Is it I who am ...?

If you are trying to generate a sentence or two that can express the provided meaning, read on. You want to do one of the following:

  • Use parallelism. Then the balance in your sentence(s) will help the reader understand.
  • Use the natural word order for the progressive tense question (Are you getting...?) in the second half of your thought.

The first half (Is it just me?) is good, idiomatic English, so it makes sense to keep it. The fact that it is short is another point in its favor.

Is it just me? or are you guys getting the notifications from WWE too?

Notice too moves to the end of the question here. Sometimes in English we use question marks only to show where the rising tone is located in the sentence. In those cases we do not always need to capitalize after each question mark. Prescriptivists: please note this is just an alternative definition of the parenthetical question.

However there is a trend toward over-correction in English. Practically this means that some readers may insist that a lack of capitalization is wrong in every instance a word follows the full stop (.) or question mark (?).

If you would rather avoid pointing this out you can always opt for a comma instead.

Is it just me, or are you guys getting the notifications from WWE too?

  • Right, the mistake by the OP was incorrectly using the interrogative. – Lambie Dec 3 at 18:59

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