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How to use two adverbs in one sentence is been asked at least four times here:

Use of two or more than two Adverbs in one sentence

How do I put two adverbs together in a sentence?

Two adverbs in a row with “-ly”

Do I need a comma when using multiple adverbs?

None of the questions answer the general rule of how to use two or more adverbs in one sentence!

I found these rules here, Why Adverbs Stink (and the Magic of Editing):

4 enchanting rules for adverbs
If you delete an adverb and the meaning of a sentence doesn’t change, remove it.
If you delete an adverb and the sentence weakens, try finding a stronger expression.
If an adverb modifies a verb, try picking a more accurate verb and delete the adverb.
When in doubt, delete your adverb.

(enchantingmarketing.com)

While I was searching for an answer, I stumble upon Steven King quote on adverbs

"The road to hell is paved with adverbs."

Instead, he is encouraging writers to paraphrase and refrain from using adverbs

Q: So in the light of the above advice how to avoid using two adverbs in one sentence? Is the sentence below a good example? I also welcome any other examples.

A. Recently, I have been occasionally at (place 2) transporting individuals from (place 1) and/ or securely handling and delivering something back to (1).

Or

B. Since I started working at (1), I have been occasionally at (2) transporting individuals from (1) and/ or securely handling and delivering something back to (1).

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The adverbs "recently" and "occasionally" don't work well when referring to the same events or actions: subjectively, "recently" refers to a shorter span of time than the longer experience that enables you to say whether something happens only "occasionally".

If you are referring to two or more events in the recent past, you can reword the first sentence (A) as follows:

On x / several recent occasions, I was at (place 2) transporting individuals from (place 1) and/ or securely handling and delivering something back to (1).

(This still leaves the apparent conflict between being at (place 2) and transporting x, which implies movement between two places instead of being at a specific place.)

Sentence B can be reworded as follows:

Since I started working at (1), I have on several occasions transported individuals from (1) and/ or securely handled and delivered something back to (1).

The phrase "Since I started working ..." does not imply that these events happened in the recent past; this would need to be clarified in the context in which the sentence occurs (e.g. by mentioning when you started working at x). You would then have something less vague than "recently", which is probably something the authors at enchantingmarketing.com would appreciate.

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  • Thanks for your answer! In your reward sentences you mention been "on two occasions," but I am trying to refer to several occasions. So would the following sentence works: Since I started working at (1), I have been on serval occasions trasporting individuals from ... – Moe Dec 26 '19 at 17:58
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    @Moe You're right. I don't know how I ended up with "two". Replacing it either with "several" or the exact number would also work. – Tsundoku Dec 26 '19 at 19:12

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